Stories tagged with Mali

Mar 3, 2017 ML Mali
A group of Kiva borrowers

My intellectual curiosity and passion for asking questions is what led me to pursue further studies in Finance; however, my interest in the microfinance sector is also long standing. At Kiva, I could combine both by taking up a fellowship position whereby I will be working with kiva field partners in three francophone African countries including my home country Mali.
At the beginning of February, I started my fellowship with RMCR, which is a Malian Microfinance Institution (MFI)... Continue Reading >>
Jul 7, 2015 ML Mali
Safoura is a 46-year-old woman who lives in Dieli, a small village in rural Mali. After losing her husband 12 years ago, she became a single mother of 7 children. She knows life can be challenging. 

As a kid, she could only attend primary school. She realizes that this has limited her opportunities a lot. That’s why she does everything within her power to make sure her kids can go to school.
 
Ever since she was little, Safoura has been buying and reselling groceries, just like her mother did. She buys rice, onions, spaghetti, fruits and grains in bulk, at a... Continue Reading >>
Jun 6, 2015 ML Mali
Imagine you’re a Malian farmer. Once a year you plant your corn, your sorghum, your peanuts, your millet. You pray for solid rainfall and a large enough harvest to feed your family for the year. Once you harvest your crops and sell what you can, you fret about how you’ll manage your money over the next several months, when your income is sporadic and unreliable. Since you live in a rural area, very far from the nearest paved road, storing your money in a bank isn’t really an option. And of course you support your family and friends when they get sick or encounter some other financial burden.... Continue Reading >>
Jun 6, 2015 ML Mali
The office of RMCR, the Kiva Partner in Mali where I’m serving as a fellow, is about 2 km away from my home. I’ve made it a habit to walk these 2 km. It should never take more than 20-25 minutes. Yet, usually it takes me 45 minutes to 1 hour to get there. And here’s why I love it.
 
There are some things about living in Mali that can be uncomfortable and stressful. There is a rebellion going on in the north, and occasionally they will provoke things in Bamako, the capital, as well.  But as soon as you’re out in the street, talking to the many friendly people that you... Continue Reading >>
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